The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)

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  1. Introduction
  2. Our evaluation scales in the ICF

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Introduction

The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health has been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO). It provides a unified and standard language and a framework for the description of health and health-related states.

ICF

The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) describes functioning at three perspectives: body, person and societal. The ICF organizes information in two parts. The first part deals with Functioning and Disability, the second part covers contextual factors.

Components of Functioning and Disability are divided in : (1) Body component including Body functions and Anatomical structures. A problem in body function or structure is noted as an Impairments; (2) ‘Activity’ and ‘Participation’ components where Activity is defined as the execution of a task or action by an individual and Participation is defined by involvement in a life situation. A difficulty at the person level would be noted as an activity limitation, and at the societal level as a participation restriction.

Component of Contextual factors is an independent and integral component of the classification and is divided into (1) ‘environmental factors’ and (2) ‘personal factors’. 'Environmental factors' have an impact on all components of functioning and disability but 'Personal factors' are not classified in the ICF.

The conceptualization provided in the ICF makes it impossible to understand disability without consideration and description of the environmental factors.

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Our evaluation scales in the ICF

Manual ability, as measured by ABILHAND and ABILHAND-Kids, is defined as the capacity to manage daily activities that require the use of the upper limbs, whatever the strategies involved (Penta et al. 1998, 2001, Arnould et al. 2004). It refers to the Activity domain of the ICF.

Activity limitations, as measured by ACTIVLIM, is defined as the difficulties a patient may have in executing daily activities, whatever the strategies involved (Vandervelde et al. 2007). It refers to the Activity domain of the ICF.

Locomotion ability, as measured by ABILOCO and ABILOCO-Kids, is defined as the individual’s ability to move about effectively in his/her environment. It refers to the Activity domain of the ICF.

Satisfaction in Participation, as measured by SATISPART-Stroke, is defined as the patient’s involvement in life situations (WHO, 2001). SATISPART-Stroke measure the patient 's perceived satisfaction in participation in different life situations.

Pain representation, as measured by the Situational Pain Scale, is defined as the individual's mental representation of painful imaginary situations.

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